An improver’s guide to squash : 5 top tips

by Kylie Lindsay

In this essential ‘improver’s guide’ to squash, players who are looking to improve their game will learn a mixture of technical and tactical tips that will help them make giant leaps forward.

These top tips have been put together by ex-world professional women’s squash player, turned coach, Kylie Lindsay (nz), who’s visiting here in Bristol to spend some time with hadrian stiff and the elite squash team in order to learn and develop further her squash coaching skills. you can find out more about kylie here.

 

 

 1. Purposeful practice

Every session you do should have a purpose. Whether that be a solo working on a particular shot, a pressure session where you are working at high intensity or a practice match where you might be working on a particular tactic. You should try and put 100% into whatever the focus of that session is and make the most out of the time you have to train.

 

2. Watch squash

One of the best ways to learn and improve your game is by watching. Whether it be professional players on PSATV, a tournament you’re playing in or just local players at your club, they are all opportunities to learn. This is where you can pick up little tips and ways of playing (or ways not to play) and try and implement them into your own game or training.

 

3. Control the T

Ideally you want to be the person controlling the T when you play. In general, the person controlling the T will be the person who dominates the rallies which means they are doing less work while being able to put their opponent under more pressure. This can be done by establishing a good length but also by working your opponent into the different corners and areas of the court and then making sure each time you’re making the effort to recover back to the T and making it as hard as possible for your opponent to move you from that position.

 

4. Vary your training

It can be easy to just do the same training or play the same people all the time. This can become boring or stale and actually limit your ability to improve. Mix things up! Play or train with different people, try soloing (listening to music if this helps), hit with a coach to pick up some tips or try something new in the gym. You might just find that adding a little variation adds to the enjoyment of playing and gives you that spark you need to improve.

 

5. Have fun

Most importantly enjoy what you’re doing! This doesn’t mean you can’t take your training seriously and want to improve but if you’re enjoying what you’re doing and the process you are more likely to want to stick at it and keep improving.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

read

Young Indian star flourishes from the intensive Bristol experience

by hadrian

We recently hosted Tanishka Jain a top ranked junior from India and her mother for a month of intensive coaching and training in Bristol. Tanishka’s father joined for the last few days to witness the improvements. ‘Thank you Sir for briefing us about Tanishka’s daily schedule that needs to be followed on a day to basis….

learn more

Technique development during summer camps

by Filip Madaric

We are only a few weeks away from our first ever Adult Summer Camp in Torquay. One of the major topics all players look for is technique and it’s progression. We will dive into the core of technique development across all levels. What makes our shots really stand out and how simplicity in delivering our…

learn more

From Los Angeles to Bristol – a players experience

by Josh Goldstein

I work as an immigration lawyer in the U.S., helping athletes, including professional squash players and coaches get green cards and work visas. But I decided to get away from my desk onto the court to work my own squash game for a change. When I first decided to come to Bristol to train with…

learn more

29 Hours in Bristol

by Hannes Schoeman

After a very cold winters morning drop-off at 04:45am in Cambridgeshire, about 30 minutes from Royston, I took the bus at 05:05am to Bristol via London. My stopover in London was cut short when I was luckily allowed to board an earlier bus than intended – score! Whilst travelling (collectively) for 5 hours I was…

learn more

“TRAINING IS IN EVERY MOMENT”

by Tom Ford

In most circumstances we tend to view our training sessions in isolation to life. Whether we are a professional or an amateur, younger or older; whether we go to the gym or we do cardio; we play the game and return to “normal life”. We use this brief moment in time to learn or develop…

learn more
This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more
Contact us

How can we help? Are you looking for something special?